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Ruby-Spears
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Animators
    (1977- )
    Based in Burbank, California
    Founders of Ruby-Spears Enterprises (1977)
    Joseph Ruby (born 1939)
    Kenneth Spears (born 1942)
    Sound editors and writers at Hanna-Barbera Productions (creators of the Scooby-Doo brand, 1968)
    Producers at DePatie-Freleng Productions (1971)
    Producers of ‘Plastic Man (1978 version),’ ‘Mighty Man and Yukk!’ ‘Fangface,’ ‘Thundarr the Barbarian,’ ‘Rubik the Amazing Cube,’ ‘Alvin and the Chipmunks (1983 version),’ ‘Saturday Supercade,’ ‘Mr. T,’ ‘It’s Punky Brewster,’ ‘Chuck Norris Karate Kommandos,’ ‘Superman (1988 version),’ ‘Police Academy! the Series’ and ‘Dink: The Little Dinosaur’
    Their early years were a hotbed of licensed properties — with a few originals.
    Because their competition at the time was NBC’s Hardy Boys (Filmation), they were deathly terrified the first season of Scooby-Doo would be wiped out.
    A year into their founding, they were purchased by Filmways — which was later bought out by Taft Broadcasting and became a sister company to their mentors’.
    Having entered the Dark Age of (limited) Animation, they were hampered by the same standards-vs-durability dilemma that affected their mentors.
    By the 1990s, their studio had become a shadow of its former self; eventually, as with their mentors, it fell to Warner Brothers.
    The Shaggy character from Scooby Doo – of which Fangface was a knockoff, right down to the Scrappy sidekick – was clearly based on Ruby.
    They were perfectly aware that the younger generation would determine the future of animation and thus went to great pains to make their works suitable for most age ranges.
    One series – Piggsburg Pigs! – went for Canadian voice talent rather than stateside.
    Their Emmy-nominated special ‘The Puppy Who Wanted a Boy’ put the ABC network on a roll, with three supplement specials and a regular series.
    For their efforts in bringing the Scooby Doo series to life, they were given watches depicting their signature Great Dane character.
    Their website is full of detailed interviews on their higher-profile works.

Credit: Cool It All Right?


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