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Herbert W. Kallmbach
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Attorney
    (October 19, 1921-September 15, 2017)
    Born in Port Huron, Michigan
    Personal attorney for Richard M. Nixon
    Deputy Finance Chairman for the Committee to Re-Elect the President (1972)
    Pled guilty to one count of violating the Federal Corrupt Practices Act and one count of offering an ambassadorship in return for a campaign contribution (February 25, 1974)
    Served six and a half months in jail (released January 5, 1975)
    Prohibited from practicing law for two years (1975-77)
    He raised $4 million for Nixon’s reelection through illegal quid pro quo arrangements, such as receiving $2 million from dairy cooperatives in return for Nixon increasing price supports for milk.
    One potential ambassador he demanded a campaign contribution from complained, ‘Isn’t $250,000 an awful lot of money for Costa Rica?’
    He oversaw a secret $500,000 fund to finance Donald Segretti’s ‘dirty tricks’ campaign against Democratic candidates.
    He distributed $220,000 in ‘hush money’ to pay off the Watergate burglars.
    He told the Senate Watergate committee that he thought the money was simply to pay their legal fees – despite having been told to use an alias, to only use pay phones when discussing the money, and to hide the money in hotel laundry bags.
    Senator Daniel Inouye said about his testimony, ‘I would gather from your success that you must be a great lawyer. Therefore, I find it extremely difficult to believe that you are not aware that illegal activities were being carried out.’
    He was a Navy aviator in the European and Pacific theaters during World War II.
    He was married to Barbara Forbush for 57 years.
    He said about the $220,000 given to the Watergate burglars, ‘I was dealing with the counsel to the President of the United States…. It was absolutely inconceivable to me that this man could ask me to do an illegal act.’
    He was released early from prison for cooperating with the prosecution of other Watergate participants.
    A friend reported that when he went to prison, he did not receive ‘some word of sympathy or encouragement from the President, or at least an expression of gratitude for his years of unquestioning loyalty.’

Credit: C. Fishel


    For 2020, as of last week, Out of 1 Votes: 100% Annoying
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    In 2017, Out of 24 Votes: 50.0% Annoying
 
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