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Robert Aldrich
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Filmmaker
    (August 9, 1918-December 5, 1983)
    Directed 'Big Leaguer (1953),' 'Apache (1954),' 'Vera Cruz (1954),' 'Kiss Me Deadly (1955),' 'The Big Knife (1955),' 'Autumn Leaves (1956),' 'Attack! (1956),' 'The Last Sunset (1961),' 'Sodom and Gomorrah (1962),' 'What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962),' '4 for Texas (1963),' 'Hush... Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964),' 'The Flight of the Phoenix (1965),' 'The Dirty Dozen (1967),' 'The Legend of Lylah Clare (1968),' 'The Killing of Sister George (1968),' 'The Grissom Gang (1971),' 'Ulzana's Raid (1972),' 'Emperor of the North Pole (1973),' 'The Longest Yard (1974),' 'Hustle (1975),' 'Twilight's Last Gleaming (1977),' 'The Choirboys (1977),' 'The Frisco Kid (1979)' and '...All the Marbles (1981)'
    President of the Directors Guild of America (1975-79)
    Died of kidney failure at age 65
    He went to the University of Virginia to study economics, but dropped out (1941).
    His uncle, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., used his influence to secure him a job as a production clerk at RKO Pictures.
    On directing films, he quoted: 'A director is a ringmaster, a psychiatrist and a referee.'
    In 1965, he divorced his first wife and mother of his 4 kids to marry model Sybille Siegfried.
    The money he made from 'The Dirty Dozen (1967)' allowed him to buy his own studio (which he called Associates & Aldrich), but it became awash in red ink and folded shortly afterwards.
    As president of the Directors Guild of America in the late '70s, he oversaw negotiations of creative rights for directors. This union activism pissed off studio heads and cost him work toward the end of his career.
    He worked as an assistant director for such famed Hollywood directors as Charlie Chaplin and Jean Renoir.
    In the '60s he wasn't afraid to tackle and direct controversial subjects like incest and homosexuality in 'Sodom and Gomorrah (1962)' or lesbianism in 'The Killing of Sister George (1968).'
    He directed 5 different actors in performances that earned them Academy Award nominations (Bette Davis, Agnes Moorehead, John Cassavetes, Victor Buono and Ian Bannen).
    He was frustrated at not being able to achieve full independence from the Hollywood machine to create his vision of films HIS way.
    His last film, '...All the Marbles (1981),' earned him the Japanese 'Hochi Film Award' for 'Best Foreign Language Film.'
    All four of his children followed in his footsteps and have become active members in the film industry.

Credit: Scar Tactics


    In 2016, Out of 4 Votes: 50.0% Annoying
    In 2015, Out of 10 Votes: 60.0% Annoying
    In 2014, Out of 9 Votes: 44.44% Annoying
    In 2013, Out of 22 Votes: 59.09% Annoying
    In 2012, Out of 8 Votes: 37.50% Annoying
    In 2011, Out of 13 Votes: 61.54% Annoying
    In 2010, Out of 24 Votes: 54.17% Annoying
    In 2009, Out of 21 Votes: 66.67% Annoying
    In 2008, Out of 44 Votes: 36.36% Annoying
    In 2007, Out of 61 Votes: 54.10% Annoying
    In 2006, Out of 112 Votes: 46.43% Annoying
    In 2005, Out of 309 Votes: 44.98% Annoying
 
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